ENT complaints associated with COVID-19 infection

Caroline Huart, Karl Le Bras, Caroline de Toeuf, Naima Deggouj, Philippe Rombaux Published in the journal : May 2020 Category : Otorhinolaryngology

Although fever, respiratory symptoms, cough, and fatigue were initially considered as the leading symptoms of COVID-19 infection, it has now become evident that patients often report ear, nose, and throat (ENT) symptoms. Notably, we are currently facing an outbreak of olfactory dysfunction along with the COVID-19 pandemic. Although the World Health Organization states that this symptom is less common, several studies have demonstrated that this symptom is often observed, and that anosmia may even constitute the only complaint of SARS-CoV-2 carriers in some cases. Consequently, it is now admitted that patients with isolated sudden anosmia and no nasal obstruction should be considered as potential COVID-19 patients. Hence, this symptom should motivate the initiation of quarantine and use of appropriate personal protective equipment for attending medical teams.

As SARS-CoV-2 has a tropism for ENT mucosa and given that ENT procedures may generate aerosolization, ENT examination is a procedure with a particularly high risk of transmission for medical doctors. Therefore, adequate personal protective equipment should be employed when performing ENT examination. Moreover, it is advised to limit procedures leading to aerosolization as much as possible, as well as to adapt ENT surgical techniques during the pandemic.

This paper has reviewed the ENT symptoms possibly related to COVID-19 infection, with a particular focus on anosmia. We have also provided a reminder concerning good clinical practice recommendations in the ENT setting.

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Incidental finding of a nasopharyngeal mass in an anterior pituitary insufficiency setting

Lara Delcour (1), Marie-Anne Labaisse (2), Carine Hinkeltz (3) Published in the journal : December 2018 Category : Endocrinology, Otorhinolaryngology

The differential diagnosis of nasopharyngeal masses is vast and mainly comprises three categories of lesions: benign masses corresponding to benign tumors and inflammatory lesions, malignant tumors, and congenital lesions. The age of the patient, clinical context, symptoms associated with the mass, as well as iconographic data are essential to orientate professionals towards the various possible etiologies. In a context of hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation, and with reference to the embryological origins of the pituitary gland, the hypothesis of extracranial ectopic pituitary tissue is, although rare, an etiology that must be evoked when confronted to a nasopharyngeal mass. However, biopsy with an anatomopathological examination proved to be the only technique able to confirm the lesion’s histological origin.

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